What Makes a Good Re-activation Program

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What makes a good re-activation program

A huge portion of your database are likely not to have purchased anything from you in several months. Nearly every online business has this issue, with customers only buying once and never return. Yet get them to come back again and they are far more likely to be a customer for life as habit forms.

Here are our ideas for what makes a good re-activation program.

Make it Personal

Personalisation creates impact in the inbox, and including products the customer is most likely to be interested in based upon their last purchase will maximise its chances of success. For travel organisations, this could even be a picture of the last holiday they went on, something likely to grab attention more than somrthing that is not recognisable to them.

Do it early enough for it to work

The longer someone is inactive for the harder it becomes to reactivate them. Traditional reactivation emails might wait a year until they will be sent but if you have a product with a high frequency of purchase it’s far better to do it after several weeks of no activity.

Cut-through creative

These campaigns have to work harder than your standard weekly sends so invest time in stand-out creative. Start with a copywriter coming up with a message that fun, engaging creative can be built off.


Value creates impact and a reason to do something now. Offer a time sensitive discount to customers and it’s far more likely to gain attention and encourage a sneaky peek to see if there is anything they like, and the added urgency won’t leave them to put it off for another day. No-one likes missing out on a bargain.


This segment of your customer base are unlikely to be the most engaged so a one hit approach will have limited success. Repeat the emails, removing those which have responded to give yourself the best chance of reactivating them.

Speak to our email experts today to find out how you can use email to re-engage with your subscribers.

About Rupert Adam

Marketing Manager at Emailcenter, the UK's largest independent ESP.